Your Search Results

Rude Mumbai

Comments Off

Published in The Asian Age, 28 June, 2006

Sir, I am not surprised that Mumbai has been found to be the rudest city in India. I came to Mumbai three years ago and found that while the people were in general generous and kind, at the same time they lacked “etiquette.” One observed this especially while talking to rickshaw-wallas, bus conductors and even shopkeepers. Most of them use “tu” instead of “aap.” The rudeness of Mumbai is in its “language.”

Aditya Rangroo

Letter to the Editor

Comments Off

Published in The Asian Age, 26th Aug, 2005

Sir, The death sentence given to Sarabjit Singh by the Pakistani Supreme Court, if carried out, will be a grave mistake. If he is indeed a RAW agent, Pakistan should give us the evidence to prove his links with RAW. By the way, Sarabjit Singh has enough evidence to prove his innocence. Therefore, this is an appeal to the Indian government to save Sarabjit Singh (PM says he’ll talk to Pervez on ‘spy’ issue, August 24). The poor fellow has been imprisoned for the past 15 years. And now Pakistan information minister Sheikh Rashid (who himself harboured militants at his own farmhouse) claims that nobody can save Sarabjit, not even President Pervez Musharraf. This cruel decision shows Pakistan’s strong hostility and hatred towards India.

Aditya Rangroo,
e-mail

75 years later

Comments Off

Published in The Asian Age, 24 March, 2005

Sir,
On 23 March, 75 years ago, three men embraced death happily and boldly. The British empire was so scared of them even after their execution, that it got rid of their bodies in a clandestine manner. Bhagat Singh, Sukhdev and Rajguru sacrificed their lives for the cause of freedom. We can never forget their contribution. Today everyone believes that India would have been different had Bhagat Singh and his comrades been alive. We can produce many famous politicians and leaders, but there will be only one Bhagat Singh.

Aditya Rangroo

Nation forgets Bhagat Singh

Comments Off

Published in the Published in the Daily Excelsior, 23rd March, 2006

Sir,
Exactly 75 yrs ago, three men mounted gallows and embraced the noose happily and boldly. Imperial powers were so afraid that even after their execution they clandestinely took their bodies in isolation and chopped them into pieces and threw them into the famous Sutluj river. Bhagat Singh, Sukhdev and Rajguru sacrificed their lives for the cause of freedom; we can never forget the contribution made by them during freedom struggle. Today everyone believes that India would have been different if Bhagat Singh & comrades would have been alive. It is satisfying to learn that India regarded him “National Hero” but at the same time it pains to learn that no sort of tribute is paid to him on his martydom or birthday. Moreover, only slight information is available about him in syllabus in schools. Has India really done justice to his sacrifice? We should appreciate movies like “Rang De Basanti” for bringing Bhagat Singh and his ideologies back. We can produce famous politicians or leaders of that era but there can be one and only one Bhagat Singh.

Yours, Aditya Rangroo

Forgotten hero

Comments Off

Published in The Asian Age, 1 Oct, 2006

Sir, September 28 was the birthday of two legends — Bhagat Singh and Lata Mangeshkar. I was glad to see that all television channels telecast programmes on Lata Mangeshkar. But at the same time, I did not see a single television channel airing any programme related to the great martyr Bhagat Singh. Is Lata Mangeshkar a bigger achiever than Bhagat Singh?

Aditya Rangroo

Sarabjit must be released

Comments Off

Published in The Tribune, 31 Aug, 2005

III

Death sentence for Sarabjit Singh is unfair. He has strayed into the border in 1990 and Pakistan branded him as a RAW agent. Strangely, while Pakistan hasn’t been able to show the documents to prove his crime, he has enough evidence to prove his innocence. Therefore, the Government of India should try to save Sarabjit from the gallows.

ADITYA RANGROO,
Mumbai

No appeal

Comments Off

Published in the The Asian Age, 23 July, 2005

Sir,
The news is that for the first time the Hurriyat will talk to the Pandits. They will visit their camps. It is to highlight their claim to “secularism.” But strangely, they have been struck by secularism only after their recent meeting with General Pervez Musharraf. How can these people pose as conduits or mediators between the governments of the two nations, when they themselves are the ones who started violence and terrorism? What are these people going to offer to the Pandits? And why do they want to talk to the Pandits? Is it that in this post 9/11 world, Hurriyat leaders have understood that violence has lost its appeal. Therefore they want to project themselves as non-violent, peace loving people. These people want a secular image and are therefore trying to use the Pandits.

Aditya Rangroo,
Kandivli, Mumbai

Languishing in Pak jails

Comments Off

Published in the Kashmir Images, 20th July, 2005

Dear Editor,
Recently I read in a local newspaper a report saying several youths from J&K were languishing in the Lakhpat jail of Lahore, Pakistan. Some of these have been sentenced to 7 years imprisonment and some that of 10 years. Although they all have completed their jail term but still they are not released. Jail conditions are worst and many of them have died in the jail itself even after completing their jail term.
Few prisoners have written a letter to the government of India, but to their utter disappoint not a single initiative has been taken so far. Prisoners neither are brute criminals nor belong to any terrorist group; reports have proved that all are localite and have mistakenly crossed the border in early 1990s. Under these circumstances should not the chief minister provide immediate attention to those youths who haven’t seen the sunlight for the last 12-15 years?

Aditya Rangroo

Existence of God – A big question mark

Comments Off

By Aditya Rangroo

My grandmother every morning offer prayers to Almighty. Her day begins with prayers and ends with meditation. I often ask her, whom you are offering prayers and devoting so much time, she always says that there is an unknown and unseen force that has created, controlled and directed the entire dynasty and we (human beings) are his creations. He is Supreme Being. People recognize him by different names Bhagwan, Allah, and Jesus. People search him in temples, mosques, churches and even keep fasts on various days in a year. It is believed that one can feel his presence in holy places of mecca-madina, kedarnath-badrinath, Vaishnov Devi, Amarnath etc. Even, many wear an accessory which represents the God or are a symbol of God. There are many white men or more precisely sadhus, priests, Maulavi around and they have been declared next to God. People even worship them.

Continue Reading…

HOMELESS PANDITS

Comments Off

Published in The Asian Age, 18th June, 2005

Sir,
I have been going through your esteemed newspaper very attentively and certain questions have been cropping up in my mind. When terrorism erupted in the Kashmir valley, at the very outset the terrorists made us, the Pandits, their victims. The community was forced to leave the valley as refugees and they are still refugees in about 15 camps in different parts of the country. A professor known for writing on history and society wrote a letter to the militant leadership in late 1989 asking them to explain their policy and attitude towards the religious minority since they claimed they were fighting a “freedom struggle”. Next day they replied to his letter in a popular local daily by simply saying that all Kashmiri Pandits should join them in their armed struggle against India as otherwise their life and property would not be safe. After this open threat, my family left Kashmir, in the dead of night. It has over 15 years that I like, the other Pandits, am thrown on the roadside, without the place of my own. We never went back to Kashmir. They will not accept us. The Indian government, unfortunately, was not very caring. It does not want to displease the majority population of Kashmir and prefers that we do not return to our homeland. After our departure from Kashmir, the locals first looted our homes, and then set them on fire. And now we are busy appreciating Jinnah, busy talking about Yasin Malik .But we are not ready to recognize the blood soaked history of the Kashmiri Pandits.

Aditya Rangroo
Kandivli, Mumbai

Why shall Pandits talk to Hurriyat?

Comments Off

Published in the Kashmir Images, 19th July, 2005

Dear Editor,
The news is that for the first time the Hurriyat will talk to the Pandits. They will visit their camps. It is to highlight their claim to “secularism”. But strangely, the thought of secularism has struck them only after their recent meeting with the Pakistan President General Musharraf.

On 14 September 1989, Pandit Tika Lal Taploo, the chief of BJP in Kashmir was shot dead by the KLF (at that time it was called KLF and later JKLF) gunmen about thirty yards outside his house. After this incident, one Professor who was known figure, writing on history and society wrote a letter to the militant leadership in late 1989 asking them to explain their policy and attitude towards the religious minority since they claimed they were fighting a “freedom struggle”. Next day they replied to his letter in the popular paper called Kashmir Times referring to his letter and simply saying that all Kashmir Pandits should join them in the armed struggle against India otherwise their life and property were not safe. But, Pandits declined to take up arms against Indian troops.

Now after the 16 years of exile, how these people pose conduits/mediator between the governments of two nations when they themselves started violence and terrorism. What these people are going to offer to the Pandits? And why they have started feeling the need of talking to Pandits?

Is it that in post 9/11 world, Hurriyat leaders have understood that violence has lost the appeal and therefore they want to pose and project themselves as non-violent, peace loving people?

Beleaguered Pandits are going to have a dialogue with Hurriyat on 25 July, but strangely when the whole world is aware that, Hurriyat leaders are the main root cause of Kashmir terrorism. Even the OIC has given the status of an observer to the secessionist Hurriyat and not to any populist group from Kashmir. Had they been the representatives, there would have been people from other religious minorities in the group. Are there any?

These people want a secular image and are therefore trying to use Pandits that is all.

Aditya Rangroo

Women and media

Comments Off

Published in the Daily Excelsior, Jammu, 21 October

Sir,
With reference to (Women and Indian media, Oct 14) by Sweta Patwardhan. I welcome the kind views of author on the current scenario of women in India. It is absolutely true that media has played a great role in uplifting women’s rights and giving them recognition. But, I would like to bring the kind attention of media on those incidents which have disturbed the whole equilibrium of women in this regard. In the two financial cities of India likely Delhi and Mumbai, number of rapes has taken place the most shuddering was the rape of 16 yrs old at marine drive (Mumbai) by police constable. Every second day a rape is bound to happen in Delhi but police and media is just echoing the issue and no effective initiatives has been taken so far. When we talk about the media, it never highlights the problems of those beleaguered women in rural areas which are facing discrimination, domination and most popularly dowry issue. Even in MNCs women are facing exploitation by their bosses and colleagues. If media has given enough attention to the women but at the same time it has neglected the various issues. If man and women share equal rights then why not women have reservation in assembly, parliament and services. Therefore, it is unfair to claim that a woman has got all relevant exposure and security in terms of rights, recognition and appreciation.

Yours, Aditya Rangroo
Kandivli, Mumbai

Sourav-Chappel stand off

Comments Off

Published in the Daily Excelsior, Jammu, 29th Sep, 2005

Sir,
This refers to the letter written by Colonel R D Singh’s (Chappel vs Sourav, 26th Sep). He has expressed his kind view on the on going controversy between Chappel and Ganguly.
The author has unnecessary criticized Chappel for criticizing Ganguly. Every cricket fan knows that Ganguly has failed to provide his best in both test matches and ODIs. Since he has been struggling for a long time then why should India keep him in a team, is it just because he is the captain and an experienced player. Chappel just did his duty to inform BCCI about the form of Ganguly. It is high time that we should not let this continue and give a chance to other players also.

Yours, Aditya Rangroo
Kandivli, Mumbai

Save Sarbajit Singh

Comments Off

Published in the Daily Excelsior, Jammu, 30 Aug, 2005

Sir,
The execution sentenced by Pakistan to Sarbajit Singh is unfair and unjustifiable. He has mistakenly crossed the border in 1990 due to which Pakistan has labeled him a RAW agent. If it is so, then Pakistan should present all the evidences which will prove his links with RAW. Pakistan hasn’t been able to show all the documents which will prove his crime, whereas he has enough evidence to prove his innocence but Pakistan didn’t take it into consideration.
Therefore, this is an appeal to the Indian Government to save our Indian brother Sarbajit Singh. Poor fellow hasn’t seen the light for past 15 years.
On the other hand, Pakistan information & broadcasting minister Sheikh Rashid claimed that nobody can save Sarbajit not even President Musharraf. Don’t you think this cruel decision made by Pakistan has showed their strong hospitality and hatred towards India?

Yours, Aditya Rangroo
Kandivli, Mumbai

Get prisoners released

Comments Off

Published in the Daily Excelsior, Jammu, 21st July, 2005

Sir,

While going through this newspaper I came across a news item about several youths from J&K who are languishing in the lakhpat jail of Lahore, Pakistan. Some had been sentenced for 7 years prison and some 10 years, and, they all have completed their jail term but still they are not released. Jail conditions are worst and many of them have died in the jail itself even after completing their jail term. Few prisoners have written a letter to the Government of India, but to their disappointment not a single initiative has been taken so far. Prisoners neither are brute criminals nor belonged to any terrorist group; reports have proved that all are locals and had mistakenly crossed the border in early 1990s. Reports have also proved that, all youths are very poor and belong to the rural class. Under these circumstances, our Chief Minister, Mufti Mohammed Sayeed, should immediate attention to these youths. Therefore importance should be paid to this matter and efforts made to get them released immediately. This is the humble request to the Jammu and Kashmir Government, to look the matter seriously and provide the great alternatives to those who are on the death edge.

Yours, Aditya Rangroo

Days which left a scar on Humanism

Comment first! »

By Aditya Rangroo

It was winter season. My cousin and I were playing close to the window. Suddenly I heard people murmuring. I came close to the window and found a score of people gathered together frantically screaming “humko chahye aazadi, aazadi ka matlab la ilaah-illah”. I was too young to understand what it meant. All our neighbours and we shut and locked the doors. Many people started crying out of fear then I realized there was something serious and wrong. But most of the people didn’t come out of their homes. The next morning I heard a very loud noise. I ran downstairs and saw a man held by four unknown persons. Within a few minutes they shot him dead. It was what my eyes saw. My mind got blurred and I fled towards my home. That was the most horrible day of my life. After that incident I saw an old lady weeping and I realized her son was killed in front of her eyes. A loud speaker announcing “Pandits leave Kashmir and leave your wives and sisters here”. I lived for a full month under stress. I was a child just 6 years old who saw human blood splashed on floor, dead bodies and the tears of many people. I am a victim of Kashmir terrorism and still I am not able to come out of that horrible dilemma. People left their property unprotected and migrated to Jammu and then shattered in different parts of world empty hands.

Continue Reading…

Aditya Rangroo

Comments Off

Aditya.JPG

Good Morning World

Comments Off

Aditya Rangroo, student of Mass Media, Journalism as specialization from the University of Mumbai. I was born in Kashmir but brought up in Delhi. I completed my 10+2 from Delhi. Then, I moved to Mumbai for higher studies. Being a Media student, I have a flair for writing. And, many of my write ups have appeared in State and National locals. Even, few write ups have appeared in Pakistan locals.